Ohio Reading Road Trip
Literary Ohio For Students Links
Ohio Authors For Teachers About ORRT

Genre Links

General Writing
Fantasy
Folk Tales
Fiction
Historical Fiction
Humor
Mystery
Nonfiction

Plays, Screenplays and Scripts
Poetry
Reality-based Fiction
Satire
Science Fiction
Short Stories
Storytelling
Western

General Writing

Before you compare writing in different genres, check out a few web sites that have general tips and information on the art of writing. These include:

The web site Writers Write, for such articles as how to get ideas on what to write… with more tips from Neil Gaiman on questions to ask yourself to trigger the creative muse.

Tips on Writing from the Creative Writing for Teens Community has links to articles on how ideas can come from anywhere, how to get started writing, and how to finish a story or novel.

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America provide valuable assistance with the article, "50 Strategies for Making Yourself Work."

You'll find information on the Art of Writing at artofwritingzine.com.

Writing Tips by James Hudnall has twenty-three useful tips for writers.

Creative Writing for Teens also takes a serious look on why it's important for writers to read, both inside and outside your favorite genre.

Links to writing tools provides direct connections to dictionaries, grammar and style web sites.

Links for Word Lovers gives you link access to dictionaries, creative writing resources, thesauri, and word games.

Craftsmen of the Written Word is not only a site put together by young authors, but it also offers an opportunity for you to submit your own and read what others have written.

TeenSpace was developed by the Internet Public Library (IPL) and offers information on researching and writing, along with links to additional resources. If you are interested in learning about constructing or writing paragraphs, writing clearly, and avoiding cliches, go directly to the Writing Style section. Need to cite sources? You'll find information on using quotations and avoiding plagiarism (using someone else's work - either word for word or paraphrasing another's work - without giving credit), and the correct way to list sources for your writing.

Ohio Public Library Information Network will help you find a library nearby, many of which have online links through which you can retrieve information.

Now, on to web sites specific to literary genres!

Fantasy

About.com provides a primer and additional articles with the essay, "Fantasy 101." Also check out the multi-part article titled "Why Write Fantasy?" and you'll find more information on the page listing the top ten fantasy worlds.

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America has information on its web site about the basics of writing science fiction.

The Language Construction Kit shows budding science fiction and fantasy writers that English is not a difficult language to master! How do you invent a language for your characters? This site runs you through grammar, sound, alphabet, and word building for your own language.

The Online Writer's Community has resources, both online and print, to help you write science fiction and fantasy.

Folk Tales

Tips on Writing Folktales from Scholastic.com

Introducing Folk Tales has information on this art form, how to write folk tales and how to present them.

Multicultural Lesson on Folk Tales is designed with the goal of students creating a folk tale using a moral they would like to teach.

Fiction

Creative Writing for Teens features a beginner's guide to writing fiction.

Writer Exchange has an online Fiction Writer's Character Chart to help you flesh out your main characters.

Plotting Without Fears gives structure to fiction by showing you how to map out your story or book.

Dialogue Tips helps you write great dialogue to keep your story moving and your characters interesting.

Story Toolbox provides a brief overview of the elements that go into building a story, such as the idea, the plot, point of view, conflict, and so on.

Historical Fiction

Suite 101 has an article on how to get started writing historical fiction for children.

The Read to Write Site has links to a variety of sites that will support young writers of historical fiction, from books to read to helpful history sites.

Allan Eckert, long considered one of the finest historical fiction writers, talks with Amazon.com about his writing style.

"The Ghost Cadet" is a WebQuest on writing historical fiction. Learning advice on the site includes information on how to understand the history and the fiction in historical fiction.

Explorer's Diary WebQuest takes you through the processes of researching and writing historical fiction.

Humor

How to Write Humor is an online how-to of published stories, regarding what is humor, structure, pace and timing, and other tip by Jim Foreman.

What Makes Comedy Funny and Can We Write Humor, Too? is a curriculum unit designed by Connie Weiss to help students by writing humor.

Mark Twain and American Humor is a lesson provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities designed to help students examine structure and characterization in the short story and consider the significance of humor.

Mystery

Tips on Writing a Mystery by Scholastic.com

Mystery.net takes you through online mysteries, movies and television programs, and provides resources for mystery writers and lovers.

In How to Write a Mystery... Gillian Roberts shares provides an online mini-course on moving your mystery story from ideas to how to hide clues.

Nonfiction

Teenwriting at about.com has links to creative nonfiction writing as well as journalism.

Five fast and easy steps to writing nonfiction has information for nonfiction writers on how to brainstorm ideas, organize material, and create a clear, focused piece on any topic.

The Falcon's Pen is a writer's resource and offers an article by Amos Richardson that describes in depth how to write nonfiction.

Scholastic Online has a series of lessons developed to help students learn about nonfiction writing. While these are lessons, they are also exercises that students can undertake on their own to develop and sharpen skills.

Suite 101 provides basic interviewing techniques that should be mastered by writers.

Plays, Screenplays and Scripts

Dear Future Playwright begins a document titled "How to Write a Play: A Crash Course for Students and Drama Groups" by Aubrey Hampton.

Writing Plays/Screenwriting at about.com features good background information on writing plays or scripts and how such works fit into the general scheme of the theater.

Writer's Write

North County Times is a newspaper that features an article on how middle school students are learning how to write a play.

Poetry

April 12-18, 2004 is national Young People's Poetry Week. ORRT and the Children's Book Council encourages everyone to read, write and enjoy poetry! Poetry activities are at this site, as well as throughout Ohio Reading Road Trip.

The Academy of American Poets presents poets.org has essays on poetry, biographies of more than 450 poets, text of more than 1400 poems, and dozens of poems read by their authors or other poets.

Potato Hill Poetry has a list of links to major poetry websites.

Bedford St. Martin's a college publisher specializing in the humanities. This page on their site features questions you may ask yourself when reading or writing poetry.

Modern American Poetry describes itself as a "one-of-a-kind resource for teaching modern American poetry." The MAPS site accomplishes this through online criticism on the works of poets.

Lakewood (Ohio) Public Library Presents Ohio Poets and Poetry

10 tips for writing poetry

Teenlit.com has poetry writing tips along with links to additional information.

PoetryPower, the Internet Center for Poets, offers the top seven tips on what makes a good poem and advice to new poets.

Poetry is for the ear

Reality-based Fiction

A novel is... describes the ingredients and appeal of the different types of novels.

Creative Writing for Teens has an article arguing that, while all authors get ideas for plots and characters from real life situations, reality doesn't necessarily make good fiction.

Realism in American Literature, 1860-1890 defines realism and gives characteristics of realist literature.

Satire

The Art and Nature of Satire is described in this lengthy article that includes the history of satire and information about satire, the law, and society.

Science Fiction

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America has information on its web site about the basics of writing science fiction.

The Language Construction Kit shows budding science fiction and fantasy writers that English is not a difficult language to master! How do you invent a language for your characters? This site runs you through grammar, sound, alphabet, and word building for your own language.

The Online Writer's Community has resources, both online and print, to help you write science fiction and fantasy.

Essay About the Evolution of Science Fiction on Television

Short Stories

Writing Short Stories by Robin Nobles takes students step by step through the process of short story writing.

Writers Write presents "Good Things Come in Small Packages," detailing the sub genre of flash fiction.

Writers Writem shows in "What IS a Short-Story?" how short story writing is closer to poetry than novels.

Storytelling

Circle of Stories explores Native American storytelling through film, music, art and photography. Four Native Americans share their stories through online video. The web site also includes lesson plans that include students exploring their own family histories through stories.

Story Net is a site dedicated to the preservation and advancement of the art of storytelling. The site also features links to collections of stories, virtual storytelling sites and ethnic storytelling and folklore.

Tell A Story! is a guide to storytelling by Aaron Shepard that shows how to find, prepare and tell your story, along with hints for success.

Tim Sheppard's Storytelling Resources for Storytellers has a storytelling FAQ with advice, resources and information. You'll also find storytelling links and articles on this site.

Western

Writing Westerns by Terry Harknett explores Harknett's approach to writing in this genre from research to a list of rules.

Looksmart features an article from the Gale Encyclopedia of Popular Culture about the genre of westerns, citing this form as a "potent allegory for American society."

Looksmart is an article from the Gale Encyclopedia of Popular Culture about Zane Grey and his contributions to the genre of western novels and the idealism of the west.

Looksmart also has an article from the Gale Encyclopedia of Popular Culture titled African American Cowboys on the Western Frontier, a growing area of study and writings.

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